Get Involved

Vote for Better Food

Each of us has the opportunity to vote for better food—as Michael Pollan says, we can all vote with our forks three times a day. We can also vote for better food at the ballot box. It’s time to let our lawmakers know that food and agriculture matter every day—and especially on election day!

Vote for Better Food
What you can do:

  • Find our where your legislators stand on food issues by checking the Food Policy Action scorecard.
  • Support a Farm Bill that is a true food and farm bill. Find out the latest from the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition and take action via their website. Call your senators, representatives and state and local legislators and ask them to support good food policy.
  • Get involved with your local food policy council—these are powerful groups for influencing how food issues are handled in communities. Check with the Center for a Livable Future to find out if there’s a food policy council in your city or town.
  • Help ensure that a new generation of farmers will be able to take root and succeed. Check out the National Young Farmers Coalition to find out how to support practical policy initiatives like student loan forgiveness for farmers.

Restore our Soil

Soil holds the key to our collective food future and environmental health. But around the world, we’re losing living topsoil, which takes thousands of years to create, at an unprecedented rate. It’s being washed off the land by poor agricultural practices and degraded by large amounts of chemicals. Sustainable
farming practices help to protect and restore soil—and we can all do our part to help restore this precious and vital resource.

What you can do:

  • Watch Fred Kirschenmann’s TEDx talk about soil.
  • Find composting resources in your area here.
  • Visit an educational farm to learn more about why soil is so fundamental to every bite we eat. There are wonderful educational organizations and commercial farms across the country that open their doors to the public. When you’re in the NYC area, plan a visit to Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture; check the Farm-Based Education Network to find more educational farms in the U.S. and internationally.
  • Buy in-season produce from farms that grow a variety of vegetables, not just one. Diversity promotes soil health. (See below for more ideas about buying food.)

Restore our Soil

Know Your Farmer

Find out the story behind your food—who grew it, where it was grown, how it was grown, and how it got to you. Ask questions so that you know you’re supporting farmers who care for our health and the health of our land.

Know your Farmer
What you can do:

  • Shop at farmer’s markets and through community-support agriculture (CSA) programs, and support restaurants and retail shops that source sustainably. Check out the Eat Well Guide, Local Harvest and the USDA for options near you.
  • Help a sustainable farmer expand his or her operation by making a direct microloan through Kiva Zip.
  • Ask your grocery store to stock locally-sourced vegetables and meats.

Get Growing

Get your hands dirty by starting a garden in your backyard, windowsill, school, office or local community. Even growing just a few herbs or veggies will help you develop a new relationship with your food and the process of growing it. There are many wonderful resources to consult in communities across the country, from your local public library to gardening clubs to university extension services.

What you can do:

Get Growing

Get Healthy

Each meal is a chance to support the change you want to see in the world and support your own health and well-being. Cooking at home from whole ingredients as often as possible is a great way to start. Try incorporating a wide variety of vegetables into your diet and reducing the overall amount of meat you eat—think of meat as a side dish!

Get Healthy
What you can do:

  • Make minor changes to old, favorite recipes to create a healthier version. Search the internet for ideas. Just remember to keep ingredients as fresh and unprocessed as possible.
  • Eating well need not be expensive. Check out Leanne Brown’s free PDF cookbook Good and Cheap about how to eat well on $4/day, and try the Arcadia Mobile Market Seasonal Cookbook for more ideas and inspiration.
  • Purchase humanely-raised meat from animals raised on grass pasture. Studies show that grass-fed dairy and meat have higher levels of beneficial fats (omega-3 and CLA), which studies have shown improve health and prevent disease in humans. Animal Welfare Approved has a guide to finding products near you.

Dig Deeper

Get educated about food and farming. Talk to your farmers, food servers, and grocers to learn more about where your food comes from.

A few sources to get you started:

Dig Deeper